Reading: Mysteries: Veronica Speedwell returns, and the Mitford Sisters debut

Deanna Raybourn and Jessica Fellowes have me talking briefly about their new mysteries set in the past, escapism of the most delightful variety because the NOW is a little too much, so, take me back!

A Treacherous Curse (Veronica Speedwell #3), Deanna Raybourn, Hardcover, 352pp, January 2018, Berkley

In this, the third installment of the Veronica Speedwell series, we get more backstory on her partner in detecting, Revelstoke-Templeton Vane, aka Stoker, as the two investigate the disappearance of a man from Stoker’s difficult and storied past who did him a great wrong.

I am a huge fan of Veronica; she is one of my must-reads along with Susan Elia MacNeal’s Maggie Hope, M.C. Beaton’s Agatha Raisin, and Louise Penny’s Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of Three Pines. It is a comfort and a pleasure to have a new adventure with an old friend, especially when you know you can count on reliably amusing and skilled work from a talented author.

Deanna Raybourn imbues Veronica Speedwell with a wit, intelligence, spine, and lust for life that is refreshing and encouraging. I want to be her. In this episode she tangles with Egyptian artifacts, ancient curses, current secrets and scandals, and, as always, the conventions of the times against which, when she brushes up, she quickly dispenses with, making her own way in her own way, unafraid and with great style and aplomb. Too, the language and period detail so seamlessly delivered in these pages, offered in context so it is clear about what is being said, its meaning, its use, is the sign of a truly talented and thoughtful author. Deanna Raybourn manages not only to regale us with a cracking good story in a page-turning thrill ride, but she also educates and delights along the way. Much admiration for her.

Speaking of which, too, if you haven’t, you ought to follow Deanna Raybourn on Twitter [click HERE], because she is every bit as charming, witty, intelligent, and possessed of great style and aplomb as her creation, Veronica.

The Mitford Murders (Mitford Murders #1), Jessica Fellowes, Hardcover, 432pp, January 2018, Minotaur Books

Louisa Cannon, a poor, young woman from the lower-classes in 1919 England, in an effort to escape her abusive uncle, manages to land a position in the household of the Mitfords — the real Mitfords given fictional life in this, the first in a series by Jessica Fellowes.

Louisa becomes close to daughter, Nancy, who yearns to escape the nursery and become an adult, and on the way to her 18th birthday celebration and becoming a grown-up, she and Louisa become involved in a mystery to do with the death of Florence Nightingale Shore — another real person made fictional whose murder actually did go unsolved. Not here.

Through a series of adventures and misadventures, a twisty plot of missteps and mistaken (or stolen?) identities, and connections as intricate and dependent upon one another as the spokes of a well-woven spider’s web, mysteries are solved, love found and lost, redemption achieved, and villains vanquished; all of this done with style and quickly paced, a lovely distraction of despicable behavior made entertaining.

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So, there you have it, my dears: two delicious diversions from current events into which I sank myself, with much gratitude, over the past few days. I’ve been busy with family and dear friends and my own medical adventures, so I really look forward at day’s end (or in doctors’ office waiting rooms) to having an engrossing other world and time into which I can sink. If you, too, need to get away, both of these are great choices, along with my other favorite series mentioned earlier.

Okay, people await my presence. So, here I am, going.

 

Reading: A Mystery, A Tragedy, and a Regency Romp

Ill Will, Dan Chaon, Hardcover, 480pp, March 2017, Ballantine Books

Multiple unreliable narrators, voiced through physical text purposely out of whack — words and punctuation missing, ends of sentences dropped off, odd spacing, pages divided into multiple columns of story — all meant, I think, to keep the reader off balance, uncomfortable, yanked from complacency, make Dan Chaon’s Ill WIll a book unlike most others, a Dadaist approach to literary fiction, experimental to the point of distraction.

The story is told as collage, time jumping and changing points of view. I was enjoying it for the first two hundred pages or so but around that halfway mark I came to suspect there was not going to be satisfactory resolution nor sufficient motivation for all the trickery; that I was never going to get complete backstories of the characters; and that what I was reading was something written as an exercise in effect, less a story about the characters than a story about the author’s prowess and daring.

That show-offy quality, the bleak and hopeless tone, and the unearned length wore me out. But this novel is MUCH LOVED by many literary critics and reviewers, so, don’t take my word for it. This is just my opinion.

The Rules Do Not Apply, Ariel Levy, Hardcover, 224pp, March 2017, Random House

Ariel Levy has been through the mill. Actually, she’s been milled, ground up, beaten into biscuit-dom, chewed, swallowed, egested, and still, somehow, managed to go on.

It is not a spoiler to say that during the course of this memoir she loses a child, a spouse, and a home. I think measuring tragedies against one another a fool’s occupation, but, I’m something of a fool, and I think the loss of a child is one of the most devastating sufferings one can endure — if, endure it one can. There is no coming back to who you were before your child was ripped from your reality; you are forever changed and forever measuring the loss, and, from my experience talking to those who’ve lost a child, forever numbed to  happiness and on guard against loss in a way you were not before the tragedy.

To lose your mate as well, to have to surrender one’s home, all on top of the loss of your child — how do you survive? Ariel Levy, I suspect, manages to continue living by putting words in order, one after another, in ways that make sense and have shape — logic and form and reason that are lacking in her real life, because, there is no way to make sense or find form in the loss of a child. No way.

So, she wrote this book. She manages to convey much of the horror but it is never done in a weepy-poor-me singing the blues sort of style. She is a successful reporter/profiler (she’s worked at both New York Magazine and The New Yorker) and she lays out the story — her story — in artful prose, swiftly, not dwelling on the ache and the pain, but, rather, illustrating it, conveying it in reasoned but moving prose. This is a very short and quick book, almost a long-form article, which I read in one sitting.

Any longer would likely have lost me because there is so much pain here. But, if Ariel Levy can write this well about her own life, I have been encouraged to start searching for her profiles and reportage on the lives of others.

Where The Dead Lie (Sebastian St. Cyr #12), C.S.Harris, Hardcover, 338pp, April 2017, Berkley Books

How did I miss the first eleven episodes in C.S.Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr series? This is just my cup of tea — possibly laced with arsenic and served by a butler with a terrible secret who is probably blackmailing my guest, a not so nobleperson who is of questionable parentage.

A Regency London set mystery full of intriguing and complicated characters, artfully woven period details and history, and compelling, fast-paced storytelling written with style, grace, and wit.

In this installment, when an orphaned street urchin of London is murdered in a most brutal and disgusting way, Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin is called in by a law enforcement type unwilling to sweep the death of a child under a rug, no matter how little the child mattered and how many would gladly dismiss the death of one more useless beggar. Devlin is determined to get to the bottom of it and discovers along the way that this urchin is not the first to have disappeared mysteriously and been used and abused in such a manner. In Devlin’s relentless pursuit of the truth and the killer, he is forced to interact with the darkest sides of London’s lowlife and discover their unsavory connections to the higher born who are part of Devlin’s own circle, and, perhaps, family.

Loved this. Great distraction from life. Horrifying subject but not done in a way that sickens one. Credit where credit due; it was because of the back cover blurb by one of my favorite writers, Deanna Raybourn, author of the Veronica Speedwell (among others) series, that motivated me to sign this book out of the library. Thank you to her. I am now struggling with going back to number one through eleven in the series — MY TO BE READ PILE IS ALREADY FILLING A ROOM!

So, off I go, to read another in my stacks.

Reading: Deanna Raybourn’s “A Curious Beginning: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery”

Raybourn, Deanna

Click on cover for more information about Ms. Raybourn’s novel.

A Curious Beginning: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery, by Deanna Raybourn, New American Library, September 2015, Hardcover, 352pp

Full disclosure: while I have never met Ms. Deanna Raybourn in person, I do Twitter-stalk her and she has given my Tweets attention now and again. However, our connection is virtual and casual, neither she nor anyone connected with this novel sent it to me (I got it from the library after QUITE A WAIT) and I write about books because I want to, not because I am in any way remunerated or rewarded – well, except with the pleasure reading a good book brings, and THAT is more than enough reward.

Veronica Speedwell, returning from her spinster aunt’s funeral, thwarts a home invasion and comes justhisclose to being abducted. With an assist from a mysterious baron who claims knowledge of secrets about her past which put her in mortal danger, she heads for London where peril and discoveries await. Also waiting — though unsuspecting and impatient to the point of boiling — is the baron’s friend, Stoker, the scarred, tattooed, tempting taxidermist, historian, and who knows what else, to whom the baron entrusts Ms. Speedwell’s safety. But, with hatpin, revolver, guile, and vigor, Ms. Speedwell can — and does — take care of herself.

I was as charmed and fascinated by Veronica Speedwell as I am by Deanna Raybourn — who, as I mentioned, I follow on Twitter — and who has more than a little in common with the heroine of this new series; both are brilliant, witty, beautiful, and certain of themselves with a refreshing and inspiring energy. I hate to say they have pluck — but, it’s better than spunk.

(Interesting aside: Pluck was once slang for the act of sex, and spunk is slang for the male essence produced from sexual arousal, so, while the Ms’s Raybourn and Speedwell both have a healthy appreciation for things arousing, perhaps I ought to say they share the quality of Moxie? Mettle? Backbone? Oh hell, I just want to be GBF to either or both!)

Having read other of Ms. Raybourn’s work, I was reasonably certain I would enjoy A Curious Beginning, but when I saw cover blurbs from Rhys Bowen, author of Her Royal Spyness Series, and Alan Bradley, author of the Flavia de Luce Series, I was even more eager to dive in.

I was not disappointed. Along with a ripping and riveting plot, the rhythms and syntax of the writing manage to evoke another time and place without bogging down in heavy-handed historical hoity-toity-ness, so that the delighted reader is actually transported to Ms. Speedwell’s world, given a sense of belonging by the dramatic, thrilling, and often laugh-out-loud conjuring of the very gifted Ms. Raybourn. Particularly enthralling is Ms. Speedwell’s embrace and enjoyment of her sexual nature while Mr. Stoker is so reticent to explore his, nice plot point.

Speaking of plot, there is plenty. Veronica and Stoker run from assailants and secrets, the source of which are finally uncovered; or, are they? There is room for many a sequel, many a new adventure, and I look forward to the ride, the romp, the rollick as written by Ms. Raybourn on whom one can count for intelligent and insightful writing with a sly, saucy wit and worldly wisdom, as well as characters who are surprising and seriously entertaining. I will add Victoria Speedwell to the “looked-forward-to-&-anxiously-await-next-installment” list alongside Ms. Bowen’s Georgie and Mr. Bradley’s Flavia.

Loved it.